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Would Joe Louis Would Have beaten Tyson Fury? A Critical Analysis.

Editorial By Robert Brizel, Head Real Combat Media Boxing Correspondent

With lineal world heavyweight champion Tyson Fury’s upcoming bout with 20-0 unbeaten Swedish heavyweight prospect Otto Wallin coming up, this reporter suddenly considered an amazing subconscious riddle, Joe Louis, which Fury had already lit the fire for.

Could ‘The Brown Bomber’, Joe Louis, defeat Tyson fury in his prime? The answer is a very possible ‘yes’. However, both fighters have extraordinarily different features.

Tall fighters such as Primo Carnera and Jess Willard emerged as weak defensively against superior fighters. Louis, in his prime, was a superior technical boxer Tyson Fury. Louis, while not as big as Fury, and not as strong as Rocky Marciano, nonetheless had superior technical skills which, in a 15 round fight, would be difficult for Fury to overcome in a points decision affair. However, Louis never faced a gargantuan sized foe like Fury.

However, Fury is a multifaceted multidimensional fighter of great dimension and breath who can be hard to read at times. Fury is a master corner person, which means he really talks out what is going on after each round with his trainer in the corner, Fury is a master advocate of the game plan, and can change it and vary it as a bout progresses. Fury is also a modern-day Bobby Fischer and Muhammad Ali master of psychological warfare inside the ring. Wilder did not fall for this trap. Wilder did not outbox Fury for the most part.

Fury has been down three times, twice against Wilder, once against cruiserweight Steve Cunningham. Fury can be outworked. Louis, once down against Max Schmeling and Marciano, was done. Fury would have had to contend with Louis’s famed left jab. Louis and Fury both fight well on the outside. Fury is a better tactician on the inside, and Louis would have to prevent him from getting inside. Fury, once faced with a losing points game against the Louis jab, would almost certainly take the bout inside with Louis. If Louis could not keep Fury from going inside, there would be a great deal of holding for 12 rounds.

Both Louis and Fury are expert counterpunches. However, Fury has the ability to manhandle and brutalize his opponents often times with unorthodox roughhouse tactics. Fury cannot be overpowered. He can be hit with power though, and if Cunningham could drop and almost knock out Fury, Louis would have a chance if his power shots continued to score repeated on the Fury target. The key point is Louis had substantial punching power in his prime. There would be no other way to make 25 title defenses. Louis could go the 15 round distance too, same as Fury’s stamina. However, in another respect, Fury has a better heart than Louis. Fury has gotten up to battle on, and has yet to be beaten. Ezzard Charles took an aging Joe Louis on a 15 round trip to hell. Fury might be in for the same medicine against Louis or Andy Ruiz, if his chin gets tagged consistently by powerful power shots. Fury sets a lot of traps, both mental and physical. Louis might not have an answer.

Fury desires to surpass the Joe Louis record of 25 consecutive title defenses. This, after the draw with Wilder, is unlikely to happen. Louis did not have the sort of substance abuse issues which have plagued Fury, who appears to have overcome them. Louis and Marciano were simply more disciplined athletes than the current era of heavyweights and collection of paper champions. Louis would have beaten Andy Ruiz as Joseph Parker did, and would have defeated Anthony Joshua as he did Jersey Joe Walcott in a close war. Louis moved better than any opponents Fury will ever face. Louis’ issues were purely financial ones, by virtue of his donating purse checks to U.S. Army relief during World War II, and getting held accountable for the taxes on those donations later on by a still prejudice society.



Fury’s intelligence, inside and outside of the ring, is still very high when compared with heavyweight champions from Jack Johnson to Lennox Lewis. Fury’s unpredictability puts him in the same category of a Michael Spinks for awkwardness and unpredictability of boxing style. Fury is as feared as Mike Tyson in his prime in terms of power, psychological warfare, and knowledge of ring tactics.



Tyson Fury is still a super fighter and a big draw with a bright and spectacular confidence. Fury in his prime is as big a draw as Joe Louis. Fury has more a worldwide appeal in the television and internet era. Whether his abilities translate to victories over Ruiz, Wilder, Joshua, Luis Ortiz, Jarrell Miller, Alexander Povetkin, or any of the other big names out there in the near future remains to be seen. Joe Louis in his prime was one cut above all of the other fighters out there. Louis cut down all of the bright white hopes, even Billy Conn, and to mention Fury’s name in premature in terms of Fury’s boast of one day surpassing Joe Louis’s accomplishments as a longstanding established world heavyweight champion. Fury, like Ali, is a more multifaceted world champion of charisma and notoriety. Louis had a much more lower-key persona, and was less controversial as his handlers marketed him that way. Most importantly, neither Fury nor Louis ever ducked anybody. Overall, regardless of the final outcome, Tyson Fury versus Joe Louis would be an interesting fight.






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Robert Brizel - Head Boxing Correspondent
Robert Brizel - Head Boxing Correspondent
Robert is the Head Boxing Correspondent for Real Combat Media Boxing since 2013. Robert is also a photographer and ringside reporter for the RCM Tri State region which includes NJ, NY and PA. Robert conducts exclusive interviews, provides historical boxing articles and provides editorial ringside coverage of major boxing events. You can contact or follow Robert on Facebook and by email at robertbrizel@realcombatmedia.com.